Occupations in Demand by Education Level

Explore in-demand jobs sorted by their training, education, experience, and responsibilities.

Explore in-demand jobs sorted by their training, education, experience, and responsibilities (TEER) level for the 2023-2025 period. TEER levels are grouped as:

  • Management – management-level jobs
  • University – jobs that usually need a university degree
  • College/Apprenticeship with experience, Supervisory – jobs usually need a college diploma or apprenticeship training of two or more years, or supervisor occupations
  • College/Apprenticeship – Jobs usually need a college diploma or apprenticeship training of less than two years, or more than six months of on-the-job training
  • High school – jobs usually require a need school diploma or several weeks of on-the-job training
  • No requirements – jobs usually need a short-term work demonstration and no formal education

Within the skill level grouping the occupations are sorted by:

  • Very good – the odds of finding work in this field are much better than average for someone qualified. This is very favorable for job seekers.
  • Good – the odds of finding work in this field are better than average for someone qualified. This is favorable for job seekers.

Management

Management jobs are held by around 32,600 people, making up about 7% of all jobs. They are expected to offer about 8.7% of the new job opportunities over the next few years. While they have the highest rate of job openings because many managers are retiring, there will be fewer opportunities overall compared to other job categories because there aren’t as many managers needed. People in management jobs are usually older, so more of them are retiring.

Below are the in-demand management occupations:

Good:

  • Accommodation service managers
  • Administrators - post-secondary education and vocational training
  • Computer and information systems managers
  • Construction managers
  • Engineering managers
  • Home building and renovation managers
  • Insurance, real estate, and financial brokerage managers
  • Managers in agriculture
  • Managers in health care
  • Managers in social, community, and correctional services
  • Purchasing managers
  • Restaurant and food service managers
  • Retail and wholesale trade managers

University – jobs that usually need a university degree

Jobs that need a university degree employ the second most people, about 93,500 workers, which is 20.1% of all jobs. These jobs are expected to offer the second most opportunities, around 9,505 or 21.3%. These jobs have the highest growth at 1.5%. About half of the new opportunities will come from this growth. These jobs also have one of the lowest rates of people leaving them. This group includes jobs in healthcare and information technology (IT) that are in demand and growing.

Below are the in-demand occupations requiring a university degree:

Very Good:

  • General practitioners and family physicians
  • Nurse practitioners
  • Registered nurses
  • Specialists in clinical and laboratory medicine
  • Veterinarians

Good:

  • Biologists and related scientists
  • Business systems specialists
  • Chemists
  • Civil engineers
  • Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers)
  • Computer systems developers and programmers
  • Cybersecurity specialists
  • Database analysts and data administrators
  • Dentists
  • Electrical and electronics engineers
  • Financial advisors
  • Financial auditors and accountants
  • Health policy researchers, consultants, and program officers
  • Information systems specialists
  • Lawyers
  • Nursing coordinators and supervisors
  • Occupational therapists
  • Other financial officers
  • Other professional engineers
  • Physiotherapists
  • Professional occupations in business management consulting
  • Psychologists
  • Securities agents, investment dealers and brokers
  • Social workers
  • Software developers and programmers
  • Software engineers and designers
  • Therapists in counselling and related specialized therapies
  • Translators, terminologists and interpreters
  • Web designers
  • Web developers and programmers

College/Apprenticeship with experience, Supervisory 

Jobs usually need a college diploma or apprenticeship training of two or more years, or supervisors 

These jobs have the most workers, about 116,400 or 25% of all workers. Even though they are not growing as fast as some other jobs, they are still expected to create the most new job openings, about 1,0985, or 24.6%. That is because there are already so many people working in these jobs. 

Below are the in-demand occupations for this category:

Very Good:

  • Carpenters
  • Early childhood educators and assistants
  • Licensed practical nurses

Good:

  • Accommodation, travel, tourism, and related services supervisors
  • Accounting technicians and bookkeepers
  • Agricultural service contractors and farm supervisors
  • Air pilots, flight engineers, and flying instructors
  • Animal health technologists and veterinary technicians
  • Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics, and mechanical repairers
  • Bricklayers
  • Cleaning supervisors
  • Computer network and web technicians
  • Construction estimators
  • Construction millwrights and industrial mechanics
  • Contractors and supervisors, other construction trades, installers, repairers and servicers
  • Contractors and supervisors, mechanic trades
  • Cooks
  • Court reporters, medical transcriptionists and related occupations
  • Crane operators
  • Dental hygienists and dental therapists
  • Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
  • Electrical power line and cable workers
  • Electricians
  • Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
  • Executive assistants
  • Food service supervisors
  • Heating, refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  • Heavy-duty equipment mechanics
  • Industrial electricians
  • Information systems testing technicians
  • Insurance adjusters and claims examiners
  • Insurance underwriters
  • Ironworkers
  • Machinists and machining and tooling inspectors
  • Massage therapists
  • Medical laboratory technologists
  • Medical radiation technologists
  • Other medical technologists and technicians
  • Other technical occupations in therapy and assessment
  • Paramedical occupations
  • Pharmacy technicians
  • Plumbers
  • Police officers (except commissioned)
  • Procurement and purchasing agents and officers
  • Respiratory therapists, clinical perfusionists, and cardiopulmonary technologists
  • Retail sales supervisors
  • Social and community service workers
  • Steamfitters, pipefitters, and sprinkler system installers
  • Supervisors, finance and insurance office workers
  • Supervisors, general office, and administrative support workers
  • User support technicians
  • Welders and related machine operators

College/Apprenticeship

Jobs usually need a college diploma or apprenticeship training of less than two years, or more than six months of on-the-job training

This group of jobs has about 79,700 workers, which is 17.3% of the workforce. It is expected to have the second-highest number of job openings, mostly because some people will leave their jobs. They are expected to create around 7,745 opportunities.

Below are the in-demand occupations for this category:

Very Good:

  • Continuing care assistants, nurse aides, orderlies, and patient service associates
  • Cooks

Good:

  • Administrative assistants
  • Bakers
  • Bus drivers, subway operators and other transit operators
  • Butchers - retail and wholesale
  • Correctional service officers
  • Elementary and secondary school teacher assistants
  • Estheticians, electrologists and related occupations
  • Heavy equipment operators
  • Insurance agents and brokers
  • Medical laboratory assistants and related technical occupations
  • Other assisting occupations in support of health services
  • 73112 Painters and decorators (except interior decorators)
  • Payroll administrators
  • Plasterers, drywall installers and finishers and lathers
  • Property administrators
  • Residential and commercial installers and servicers
  • Roofers and shinglers
  • Transport truck drivers

High School

Jobs usually need a high school diploma or several weeks of on-the-job training

This group of jobs has about 78,300 workers, making up 16.1% of all workers. These jobs are expected to grow the slowest, just a little less than the average. Most of the new job openings, more than 70%, will happen because people leave these jobs. The biggest number of opportunities is likely to be in the retail salespersons, which is a large occupation in this group.

Below are the in-demand occupations for this category:

Very Good:

  • Home support workers, caregivers and related occupations

Good:

  • Accounting and related clerks
  • Air transport ramp attendants
  • Banking, insurance and other financial clerks
  • Bartenders
  • Fish and seafood plant workers
  • General office support workers
  • Hotel front desk clerks
  • Industrial painters, coaters and metal finishing process operators
  • Maîtres d'hôtel and hosts/hostesses
  • Other customer and information services representatives
  • Other products assemblers, finishers and inspectors
  • Plastic products assemblers, finishers and inspectors
  • Process control and machine operators, food and beverage processing
  • Program leaders and instructors in recreation, sport and fitness
  • Retail salespersons and visual merchandisers
  • Rubber processing machine operators and related workers
  • Sales and account representatives - wholesale trade (non-technical)
  • Security guards and related security service occupations
  • Shippers and receivers

No Requirements

Jobs usually need short-term work training and no formal education

This group of jobs has about 64,800 workers, which is 12% of the workforce. These jobs are expected to have the fewest openings. The rates of both growth and people leaving these jobs are a bit below average.

Below are the in-demand occupations for this category:

Very Good:

  • Food counter attendants, kitchen helpers, and related support occupations
  • Light duty cleaners

Good:

  • Cashiers
  • Construction trades helpers and labourers
  • Delivery service drivers and door-to-door distributors
  • Food and beverage servers
  • Harvesting labourers
  • Janitors, caretakers and heavy-duty cleaners
  • Labourers in fish and seafood processing
  • Livestock labourers
  • Material handlers
  • Nursery and greenhouse labourers
  • Operators and attendants in amusement, recreation, and sport
  • Other service support occupations
  • Store shelf stockers, clerks, and order fillers

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